Courting the ClinicianDate: Jun 20, 2018

PRESENTING NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL EVIDENCE IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY LITIGATION Robert L. Heilbronner and Theodore Karavidas. Article originally published in the Clinical Neuropsychologist, 1997, Vol. 11, No. 4, pp. 445-453, Swets & Zeitlinger, The Netherlands. ABSTRACT The purpose of this paper is to educate the reader about some of the issues involved in presenting neuropsychological evidence in cases where a traumatic brain injury is either obvious or suspected. Particular emphasis will be directed toward the admissibility of neuropsychological evidence and clarifying the roles of neuropsychologists as treaters and experts. Some strategies will also be presented to assist neuropsychologists in preparing to give opinion testimony. As professional and lay communities gain greater awareness of the existence and sequelae of traumatic brain injuries (TBI), neuropsychologists are becoming more frequently involved in litigation claims brought by people with TBI. As a result, there is a growing recognition of the role and value of experts in…

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Considerations in Presenting Expert TestimonyDate: Jun 20, 2018

THE ROLES OF LAWYERS AND REHABILITATION PROFESSIONALS IN LITIGATED CLAIMS Theodore G. Karavidas, Esq., Karavidas Law Offices, Chicago, IL. Articles originally published in Re-Learning Times, Vol. 6, No. 1, May 1999, Learning Services Corporation, Durham N.C. In my practice as a personal injury trial lawyer who represents those who have suffered TBI and other serious injuries, I have met with hundreds of health care professionals from a myriad of specialties. Because the job of the personal injury lawyer is to convey to insurance adjusters, opposing counsel, judges and juries the overall effects of our clients' injuries on their lives and on the lives of their lived ones, we have to gather all information about those injuries, and then present that data in an organized, interesting manner which can be easily understood by laypersons not trained in medicine or rehabilitation. We must assimilate the entire medical record of each client, read…

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Preventing Injuries from FallsDate: Jun 20, 2018

Babies and infants can be wiggly and roll around easily; toddlers and small children can climb their way into trouble. Protect your children from falls by paying special attention to windows, cribs and beds, different areas of the house, and outdoor playgrounds: Windows Install safety bars on upper-story windows. These bars must be childproof but easy for adults to open in case of fire. If you don't have safety bars on your windows, close and lock windows when children are present. For ventilation, open windows from the top, and provide adult supervision. Keep furniture away from windows to prevent children from climbing onto sills. Don't rely on window screens to keep children from falling out of windows. Cribs and beds Keep side rails up on cribs. Never leave a baby unattended on a changing table or bed. When choosing a changing table, opt for one with two-inch guardrails. Always secure…

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Preventing Brain InjuriesDate: Jun 20, 2018

Wear a helmet and other protective gear when riding a bicycle or motorcycle, and for other sports and recreational activities, such as roller staking, inline skating, skate boarding, horseback riding, or any other activities that may result in head injury. Do not drink alcohol or drink in moderation. Make sure your house is safe for children and the elderly. Wear a safety belt and put infants and children in car seats while in a motor vehicle. If possible make sure your car has an airbag. Never leave children unattended at the park or in any other recreational atmosphere. When swimming make sure the pool is clear and that the person is diving at the appropriate depth. No horseplay in the pool or pool area and supervise children in and around swimming areas; have a buddy, even for adults.

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